Experimental Economics—Core Courses

ECON 885 – Experimental Economics I

This course surveys some of the recent empirical literature in Experimental Economics. Students will get a flavor of seminal research papers, as well as some of the currently active areas of research. The background needed for the course is graduate-level microeconomic theory and game theory.

Credits: 3

ECON 886 – Experimental Economics II

Syllabus and description coming soon!

Credits: 3

ECON 637 – Econometrics I

Economics 637 is the first course in the graduate-level econometrics sequence. This course will cover the following topics: the two-variable regression model and basics of multiple regression analysis for cross section data including the mechanics of OLS, statistical properties of OLS, basic statistical inference, testing more complicated single restrictions, testing multiple hypotheses, reporting regression result, functional form, goodness of fit, adjusted R-square, dummy independent variables, dummy dependent variables, specification errors, maximum likelihood estimation, methods of moments, heteroskedasticity, serial correlation and time series regressions, simultaneous equation models, limited dependent variables, panel data, and instrumental variables.

Credits: 3

ECON 838 – Econometrics II

This class provides an introduction to the design and analysis of economics experiments. The topics covered will be useful to anybody interested in running scientific experiments, but will be primarily geared toward behavioral experiments as conducted by economists and psychologists.

Credits: 3

ECON 985 – Workshop in Experimental Economics

The Workshop provides students the opportunity to learn about current research in experimental economics from invited speakers. Students will write a referee report on some of the papers to be presented, discuss each paper in the Workshop prior to the seminar and then attend the seminar. In addition, graduate students working on research in experimental economics will have an opportunity to present their own work.

Credits: 3

Experimental Economics—Electives

Short Course – Econometric Analysis of Experimental Data

The course provides a condensed, graduate-level introduction to econometric methods that are relevant for the analysis of experimental data. We will also discuss some important conceptual problems that arise when data from (laboratory) experiments are analyzed with regression methods. These problems are illustrated using recent published papers. Empirical illustrations will be provided using Stata.

Credits: Non-credit

ECON 895 – Experimental Public Choice

The course is designed to familiarize students with current work in experimental public choice. The course is designed to help students advance to a stage where they can begin work on a dissertation or research paper in experimental public choice.

Credits: 3

ECON 895 – Neuroeconomics

Syllabus and description coming soon!

Credits: 3

ECON 496 – Experimental Economics

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to experimental economics. Through this course students will have the opportunity to: read and discuss some of the most influential papers in experimental economics; learn how to design and implement an economics experiement; and see firsthand a cutting edge research program in experimental economics.

Credits: 3

ECON 496 – Economics of the Metaverse

This course uses economics to study the emerging multiplayer online universe, which Neal Stephenson called the Metaverse in his book Snow Crash. The closest real life equivalent to the Metaverse is Second Life (SL). The questions that economists study occur everywhere and in every time period, and SL in the 21st century is no exception. You will have the opportunity to see first-hand how the metaverse is evolving, and at the same time learn economics as you gain hands-on experience of economic concepts with your fellow travelers in the metaverse.

Credits: 3

ECON 440/632 – Economic Systems Design I

Syllabus coming soon! This course introduces students to exchange institutions in economics. Exchange generally includes decentralized market interactions, auctions, bargaining, favors, mating, matching and contracts. This class will focus on decentralized market interactions and auction institutions, both theoretically and empirically. The class will include presentation of theoretical models of existing institutions and tools to think about or evaluate new ones. While most treatment of this literature is quite mathematical, the class will attempt to present the material rigorously but not overly technically. For students interested in completing the certificate in Economic Systems Design, this is the first course in the required sequence.

Credits: 3

ECON 441/633 – Economic Systems Design II

The course introduces students to exchange institutions in economics, focusing on
matching institutions and contract design, both theoretically and empirically. The class will combine
presentation of theoretical models and empirical evidence of existing institutions. While treatment in this
literature can be quite mathematical, the class will attempt to present the material rigorously but not
overly technically. Students will learn about market design and, by the end of the course, will complete a
project that analyzes a real-life allocation problem. Students are not required to take EC 440/632 to enroll in this course, however having done so will be helpful. For students interested in completing the certificate in Economic Systems Design, this is the second course in the required sequence.

Credits: 3

ECON 442/634 – Economic Systems Design III

Syllabus coming soon! In this course, students use the theory and empirical evidence introduced in ESD I & II to design an exchange institution that solves a relevant real-world problem. For students interested in completing the certificate in Economic Systems Design, this is the third course in the required sequence.

Credits: 3